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Virtual Exhibitions

Mapping Our Own Future is a weekly series of solo and group virtual exhibitions curated from the Arts Project Australia stockroom. An extension of the gallery to a virtual space, the series offers a place to connect with APA artists from home.

Mapping Our Own Future
MOTTLED IMAGES

MOTTLED IMAGES

Robin Warren has an artistic practice that spans over 20 years. His works on paper explore brightly coloured and organically shaped abstract imagery. Utilising oil pastels, Copic and felt-tipped markers, his work is reminiscent of cellular organisms in bloom that radiate from a central focal point. Warren often renders multiple layers of colour that create a dream-like state as they reverberate across the paper. Though soothing, his work can have a strangely unsettling visceral quality that is enhanced by his use of unlikely colour combinations. His current virtual exhibition Mottled Images presents work created in the Arts Project Australia studio from 2017-2019. A few years ago, Warren moved from Perth to Melbourne to build his practice at Arts Project. In non-COVID times, he gets to work alongside his contemporary peers and tap into broader resources that enable him to take his career in new directions. Warren (b 1971, London) has been a studio artist at Arts Project since 2016. His work is exhibited widely and has been collected by institutions in the UK and private collectors worldwide. Robin Warren currently has work exhibited in Ghosts from the Recent Past in the Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin. Walk through the exhibition via entering a virtual room, scrolling the slideshow below or downloading the Robin Warren Mottled Images Catalogue (this link redirects to a PDF). OPEN YOUR CAMERA & SCAN THE QR CODE   Mapping Our Own Future is a weekly series of solo and group virtual exhibitions curated from the Arts Project Australia stockroom. An extension of the gallery to a virtual space, the series offers a place to connect with APA artists from home. Visit other virtual exhibitions here. Produced by Arts Project Australia curator and gallery manager Sim Luttin. 

IT’S A NO-BRAINER, ART MATTERS

IT’S A NO-BRAINER, ART MATTERS

At a time when creativity is more critical than ever, why do we still have to work so hard to justify why art is important? Artists and their art practice need to be supported and invested in – their constant questioning, exploration, raising of societal, environmental and political issues as well as their generosity of spirit make the world a better place. Art raises awareness, marks time and reflects our values. Art connects communities, shapes culture and fosters wellbeing. Art is vital, it is irreplaceable and one of the most critical aspects of our culture and humanity. According to Arts Project Australia artist Michael Camakaris, his art practice is the most important thing in his life. Not only is making art enjoyable and purposeful, it gives him a voice while providing intellectual stimulation and meaningful work. Camakaris reflects, "I make art to express myself about things like my disenchantment with the world, and how I feel about the injustices in life – some people having so much and some people having so little. Through art, you can let out some of your anger and express the way you view the world. Along with all the other disciplines in the arts, like films and theatre, what you express can lead to more acceptance of people with differences and increase understanding in society." We know art has an extraordinary impact on our lives – the community tells us, studies tell us and the economy tells us. The jury is in and it's a no-brainer: art matters and is too important not to share. Mic drop. Featuring work by Arts Project artists Michael Camakaris, Samraing Chea, Bronwyn Hack, Michael Licenblat, Eden Menta, Lisa Reid, Cathy Staughton and Terry Williams. Walk through the exhibition via entering a virtual room, scrolling the slideshow below or downloading the It's a no-brainer, art matters catalogue (this link redirects to a PDF). OPEN YOUR CAMERA & SCAN THE QR CODE Mapping Our Own Future is a weekly series of solo and group virtual exhibitions curated from the Arts Project Australia stockroom. An extension of the gallery to a virtual space, the series offers a place to connect with APA artists from home. Visit other virtual exhibitions here. Produced by Arts Project Australia curator and gallery manager Sim Luttin. 

SENSOR

SENSOR

  Just as a QR code stores data in a matrix of geometric cells, the signature marks and commonly recurring motifs in creative works all contain an identifiable signature through which we can ‘scan’ the subjectivity of the artist.  This exhibition invites the viewer to sense the thumbprint of the maker, drawing upon the unique code to think more deeply about the artist’s particular sensibility. Thus, the viewer becomes the receiver or the sensor, accessing the bounty within each artwork. Like an iPhone that uses fingerprint recognition to open up an abundance of information, each artistic trope becomes a portal into unchartered territory. When 'scanned' a whole universe can open up, and through this mechanism or framework the artist reveals their distinct voice.  Sensor encourages the viewer to take a deeper look at what is hidden in the coded form within each artist's chosen, often idiosyncratic, language or thumbprint and features work by Mark Smith, Julian Martin, Kate Knight, Paul Hodges, Michael Camakaris and Jordan Dymke. Jordan Dymke has been working in the Arts Project Studio since 2012. In 2020 he undertook an internship in the Arts Project gallery, which saw him working alongside the gallery team on various projects. During this time he curated Sensor, which was set to open in July 2020. Due to COVID-19 restrictions, Arts Project is proud to present this exhibition in virtual form. Walk through the exhibition via entering a virtual room, scrolling the slideshow below or downloading the Sensor Catalogue (this link redirects to a PDF). OPEN YOUR CAMERA & SCAN THE QR CODE   Mapping Our Own Future is a weekly series of solo and group virtual exhibitions curated from our stockroom. An extension of our gallery to a virtual space, the series offers a place to connect with our artists while at home. Visit other virtual exhibitions here. Sensor has been curated by Arts Project Australia trainee Jordan Dymke. 

PAINTINGS OF WOMEN

PAINTINGS OF WOMEN

Paul Hodges is a figurative artist who has a penchant for painting theatrical, modern and historical women. It's a passion that stems from his long-time interest in theatre, ballet and popular culture. He recalls an early influence of participating in a life drawing class at RMIT in Melbourne many years ago. The challenge of painting women drives him, "It's hard to do a drawing or painting of a woman and make it a good painting." Many years of visiting the Melbourne Arts Centre and seeing theatre and ballet performances was pivotal in influencing his creative practice. In recent years, Hodges has been fascinated by Asian subcultures from China and Japan, with a particular interest in the fashion, "I am fascinated by the Lolita fashion movement," he says. The Lolita subculture is categorised by three main styles: 'gothic', 'classic', and 'sweet'. "I've seen it in the city in Melbourne too–women dressing up in anime and Lolita fashion. I think it has links to pre-romanticism and it has its roots in fashion from old times." Paul Hodges (b 1974, Melbourne) is an accomplished mid-career artist. An incredible colourist, he works across a variety of mediums. Inspired by dancers, models and the romantic Old Masters, his work represents the human figure in motion that he sources from magazines and books. Hodges has worked at Arts Project since 1998 and has presented numerous solo and group shows. His work is held in the National Gallery of Victoria (as gifted by Stuart Purves) and in private collections throughout Australia. Walk through the exhibition via entering a virtual room, scrolling the slideshow below or downloading Paintings of Women Catalogue (this link redirects to a PDF). OPEN YOUR CAMERA & SCAN THE QR CODE   Mapping Our Own Future is a weekly series of solo and group virtual exhibitions curated from our stockroom. An extension of our gallery to a virtual space, the series offers a place to connect with our artists while at home. Visit other virtual exhibitions here. Produced by Arts Project Australia curator & gallery manager Sim Luttin.

THE LONG GAME

THE LONG GAME

For most, the road to success is a long journey and no truer words have ever been said about people who work in the arts. No matter the discipline, following a creative path and putting oneself out there on the public stage takes guts and determination as well as passion, resilience and sacrifice. It takes aspirational thinking and long-term commitment, as well as an army of supporters, to keep a successful practice alive—and there are many ups and downs. Artists have to be prepared to weather just about every storm that comes their way. Whether the challenge is political, social, environmental, economic, or a pandemic, artists are often the best placed to respond while also being the most vulnerable members of our community. With a nod to fellow creatives working in the performing arts — the sector arguably most affected by the pandemic — our latest virtual offering acknowledges the importance of staying committed and focused on the long game as a crucial road map to success. The artists featured have enduring and rewarding careers in the arts, and we celebrate their longevity and dedication to their creative practice. Artists include Alvaro Alvarez, Dorothy Berry, Monica Burns, Valerio Ciccone, Alan Constable, Patrick Francis, Bronwyn Hack, Paul Hodges, Adrian Lazzaro, Fiona Longhurst, Chris Mason, Lisa Reid and Cathy Staughton. Walk through the exhibition via entering a virtual room, scrolling the slideshow below or downloading The Long Game Catalogue (this link redirects to a PDF). OPEN YOUR CAMERA & SCAN THE QR CODE   Mapping Our Own Future is a weekly series of solo and group virtual exhibitions curated from our stockroom. An extension of our gallery to a virtual space, the series offers a place to connect with our artists while at home. Visit other virtual exhibitions here. Produced by Arts Project Australia curator & gallery manager Sim Luttin.

LOVE ME TENDER, LOVE ME TRUE

LOVE ME TENDER, LOVE ME TRUE

Love me tender, love me true, all my dreams fulfil. For my darling, I love you and I always will. When you read the words of Elvis Presley's 1956 Love Me Tender, you can't help humming along to the music. That's the enduring power of Elvis. The best music, performance and art does that—it moves you and gets under your skin, long after the work has been created and released. Such is the emotive quality of Dionne Canzano's paintings and drawings as you experience them. Full of personality and love, her artworks are passionate renderings that are always drawn from the heart. The artwork selected in Canzano's solo exhibition Love Me Tender, Love Me True is first and foremost a celebration of heartthrob Elvis Presley. It also expresses her all-embracing love of life: from wild cats and magpies to popular cultural landmarks and gorgeous celebrities. This diverse collection, while focusing on the King, has a little bit of everything and is best enjoyed while humming your favourite Elvis tune. Canzano (b 1970) is a mid-career artist whose figurative work embodies veils of blended colour and detailed pastel and pencil lines. Her work explores subjects close to her heart, such as Elvis Presley, wild and domestic animals, and possess a dream-like quality with an edge. Canzano has worked at Arts Project since 2000 and presented her first self-titled solo show in 2003. She has featured in numerous group exhibitions and has work in private collections throughout Australia. Walk through the exhibition via entering the virtual gallery room, scrolling the slideshow or downloading the Love Me Tender Love Me True catalogue  (this link redirects to a PDF). OPEN YOUR CAMERA & SCAN THE QR CODE Mapping Our Own Future is a weekly series of solo and group virtual exhibitions curated from our stockroom. An extension of our gallery to a virtual space, the series offers a place to connect with our artists while at home. Visit other virtual exhibitions here. Produced by Arts Project Australia curator and gallery manager Sim Luttin. 

THE OBJECT AND THE BEHOLDEN

THE OBJECT AND THE BEHOLDEN

It seems that for the foreseeable future we are to be confined to our domestic environment, the dwelling in these intimate spaces generating ever-closer relationships with the objects within them. While caring about possessions may, for some, appear as a moral failing, it does not necessarily equate to greed or materialism. Objects create meaning and comfort, serving as bridges to people, places and moments in time, tapping into raw emotion. A gift from a loved one, a memento collected as a reminder of places close to the heart, a potted plant tenderly cared for in a favourite light-filled corner, a treasured teacup, a chair lovingly restored or the artwork that indescribably stirs. Objects can embody goals, manifest drive, generate sentiment and shape identities. We are makers and users of objects, carving meaning out of our domestic environment. And rather than serving as a poor substitute for human interaction, objects amplify connections. They are portals to memories and vessels for notions of a sense of self and belonging. They amplify and cradle our experiences and provide solace, much like a security blanket might serve as psychological comfort for a child in an unusual or challenging situation. And we most certainly find ourselves in one of those. The Object and the Beholden features work by Alan Constable, Anne Lynch, Kate Knight, Samantha Ashdown, Steven Ajzenberg, Valerio Ciccone, Georgia Szmerling, Chris O'Brien, Simon Paredes and Terry Williams. Walk through the exhibition via entering a virtual room, scrolling the slideshow below or downloading the The Object and the Beholden catalogue (this link redirects to a PDF). OPEN YOUR CAMERA & SCAN THE QR CODE   Mapping Our Own Future is weekly series of solo and group virtual exhibitions curated from our stockroom. An extension of our gallery to a virtual space, the series offers a place to connect with our artists while at home. Visit other virtual exhibitions here. Produced by Arts Project Australia gallery administrator Jo Salt. 

ROBERT BROWN: BOLD, BRIGHT AND BEAUTIFUL

ROBERT BROWN: BOLD, BRIGHT AND BEAUTIFUL

As Melbourne heads into the third week of its second lockdown, it seems like the right moment to pause and reflect on the beauty and colour in the world. With news streams inundated with pessimistic and sensationalist headlines, art serves as a positive and uplifting balm under challenging times. Take a moment to appreciate the impact of colour, an incredible communication tool affecting emotions, responses and signalling action. Cool colours—such as blue, green and purple—while soothing, can make us sad. Warm colours, on the other hand—red, yellow and orange—grab attention, alert and tend to make us happy. The artwork in Robert Brown's solo exhibition Bold, Bright and Beautiful, firmly plants itself at the warm and joyful end of the spectrum. It is right where we want to be, while we live with uncertainty and isolation in our personal lives as well as globally. Brown is an accomplished abstract artist and painter whose work on paper and canvas is characterised by his bold and vibrant use of colour and spontaneous layering. He is a master colourist, whose work makes you unashamedly happy when you view it. Inspired by nature, he draws inspiration from found images of landscapes, reinterpreting what he sees with great freedom. Brown has worked at Arts Project since the early 2000s and has exhibited extensively throughout Australia, with work in the Artbank collection, Melbourne as well as private collections throughout Australia. Walk through Robert Brown's exhibition via entering a virtual room or scrolling the slideshow below or download the Bold, Bright and Beautiful catalogue. OPEN YOUR CAMERA, SCAN THE QR CODE AND EXPERIENCE ROBERT BROWN'S EXHIBITION ON YOUR PHONE   Mapping Our Own Future is weekly series of solo and group virtual exhibitions curated from our stockroom. An extension of our gallery to a virtual space, the series offers a place to connect with our artists while at home. Visit other virtual exhibitions here.   Produced by Arts Project Australia curator & gallery manager Sim Luttin.

WHEN YOU WEAR THE MASK, THE MASK BECOMES YOU

WHEN YOU WEAR THE MASK, THE MASK BECOMES YOU

For those of us living in Melbourne, Australia the second lock down in not many months is challenging. We thought we had permanently emerged from our home-caves and begun adjusting to a new normal, only to take a step back and return, once again, to relative isolation. While gleefully patting ourselves on the back for a job well done in June, by July we had let our guard down. With our tail between our legs, we've had to admit that we're not quite as immune or good as we thought we were. Meanwhile, a debate has proliferated online regarding whether or not to wear a face mask and, if a necessity, which mask should we wear? Australia's chief medical officer Professor Paul Kelly said people living in Melbourne who can't remain socially distant when out and about for essential reasons 'should wear a mask.' So, why don't we do it? We've worn masks for a multitude of purposes throughout history including to shield, camouflage, disguise and masquerade. Face coverings have transformative qualities and can affect the way we communicate and the way we feel. From a positive standpoint, masks can be creative, liberating and empowering. When you wear the mask, the mask becomes you features work by Michael Camakaris, Nick Capaldo, Adrian Lazzaro, Julian Martin, Sammie-Jo Matta, Daniel Pace, Gavin Porter, Aidan Sefo, Cathy Staughton, Jimmy Tran and Terry Williams. It reflects on the transformative qualities wearing a mask can have on the wearer. We examine the use of face coverings from a functional as well as fanciful and speculative viewpoint. Walk through our latest exhibition via entering a virtual room or scrolling the slideshow below or download the When you wear the mask, the mask becomes you catalogue here. OPEN YOUR CAMERA, SCAN THE QR CODE AND EXPERIENCE OUR EXHIBITION ON YOUR PHONE   Produced by Arts Project Australia curator & gallery manager Sim Luttin.

THE DAY WE ALL WENT HOME

THE DAY WE ALL WENT HOME

On March 16, the Arts Project Australia studio closed due to COVID-19. One hundred and fifty artists were asked to stay home instead of coming into the Northcote studio and gallery, leaving many extraordinary pieces of art behind. It’s time for these works to be seen.  The Day We All Went Home presents 100 artworks by 54 Arts Project Australia artists and collaborating Melbourne-based artists Richard Lewer, Janelle Low and Steven Asquith. The collection spans painting, drawing, photography, digital art, ceramics, textiles and soft sculpture.  Lisa Reid's The Old Fashioned Cash Register with the Old Paper Dollar Notes and Coins is the collection's shining star, exemplary of the artist's unparalleled attention to detail. Another poignant highlight is a politically-charged work by Chris Mason; in Power station with two voluptuous ladies and a helicopter with a big sign, Mason's signature ladies sit at the base of the work with a power station gushing pollution beyond them. In the same apocalyptic breath, Michael Camakaris' gas mask collage serves a similar sense of foreboding. These ominous notes are balanced by playful reminders of community wellbeing with Adrian Salvatore's Brent Harveys VFL/AFL Games Record capturing players in a moment of glory and Lisa Reid's warm summer holiday resort scene. Then, the collection steps away from the energetic radiations of daily life and provides instants of serenity within intimate portraits by Will Murray and Bobby Kyriakopoulos, and within the soothing formations of Georgia Szmerling's plant and water abstractions and Warren O'Brien's windows. So expansive are the included works, in style, concept and medium, and the artists they represent, that careful, yet indulgent, viewing is encouraged to grasp the creative prowess, as well as insight and rigour, occurring in Arts Project Australia's studios only a few months ago.  Spend time browsing the artworks within this collection below or download the digital catalogue. If something catches your eye, join us at the auction Sunday, June 28 at 3 pm, as we auction these works to raise much-needed funds for Arts Project Australia. 

NEITHER HERE NOR THERE

NEITHER HERE NOR THERE

In our current online group exhibition, Arts Project reflects on the 'COVID-hump' that has resulted in a general state of collective ambivalence. Questions abound about whether to stay home or go out, to remain in the digital realm or connect in person. At this particular moment in time, it seems that what we decide to do is neither here nor there. Despite being told we can go back into work and gather in small groups, relaxing the rules is inconsequential. Societally, we're not 100% sure what's best to do, and our longing to race back into the world has waned as we remain suspended in an ongoing state of hypervigilance. Our movements are restricted creating awkward noncontact interactions 1.5-meter apart—it's hardly a desirable scenario. As creatures of habit, we've quickly adapted to the reality of staying home and, as we hurl toward winter, the thought of emerging from the comfort and safety of home will be more challenging than we first thought. The artwork selected for Neither here nor there touches on some of these notions of uncertainty and longing. Collections of emotive digital prints are juxtaposed with highly tactile and visceral handmade objects, forcing the viewer to reflect on feelings of ambivalence in this historic moment. Featuring work by Alan Constable, Ruth Howard, Miles Howard-Wilks, James MacSporran, Chris O'Brien, Georgia Szmerling, Lachlan Turk and Terry Williams. Scroll through the exhibition below, or view and download the Neither here nor there - Online Exhibition Catalogue. Produced by Sim Luttin, Gallery Manager and Curator at Arts Project Australia 

FROM THE STREETS

FROM THE STREETS

  James MacSporran has worked toward presenting his first solo show since October 2019—the work is sitting in the Arts Project stockroom stretched, framed, and ready to install. He'd carefully developed the theme, planned the layout, edited the abstract and titled his show. His solo exhibition, aptly titled From The Streets, was finalised in February 2020 and ready to install in March. Then COVID-19 hit, and our Northcote gallery closed indefinitely.  His solo show is rescheduled for early 2021 and will be one of the first shows presented in our Northcote gallery when it reopens. However, we couldn't wait to share his latest collection with the world, so here it is—published online as a virtual teaser of what's to come.  MacSporran (b 1970) is an emerging artist who has a painting and drawing practice that occasionally expands to include collage—preferring to work on medium-scale when in the studio, large-scale when working on public murals. Stylistically, his practice synthesises graffiti and abstraction, resulting in intricate paintings that conjure references to street art, mazes, and old-style arcade games. From The Streets presents a dynamic selection of recent multi-layered small and mid-sized artworks on paper and canvas.   MacSporran has featured in group exhibitions in Australia and Hong Kong, and his work is held in private collections Australiawide.  Scroll through exhibition below or view PDF here. This exhibition coincides with group show Fortune Favours the Brave

FORTUNE FAVOURS THE BRAVE

FORTUNE FAVOURS THE BRAVE

In Fortune Favours the Brave, Art Project Australia explores concepts of courage and bold creative undertakings that help to shape the life we live. Faced with enormous challenges associated with isolation, APA artists have turned obstacles into opportunities and, as a result, have been as busy as ever creating new work, zooming with peers and embracing the digital realm as a virtual space to work and share ideas.  Life throws all kinds of circumstances at us—good and bad—that we have little or no control over, and personal rewards don't always reflect our efforts and good intentions. However, what we can influence is how we respond to any given situation and, consequently, we can choose a path that gives ourselves the best shot at a good life. In that vein many of our artists, with support from APA, their families and networks, have embraced change and established temporary studios at home; for some artists, it's a table in the kitchen, while for others it's an entire room or shed. One thing is clear—APA artists are making the most of a difficult situation and are responding in the best way possible—by making art. Just before the pandemic, we were in the stockroom admiring recent work created in our studio. In this new world, as individual artists and as an organisation, we've quickly adapted: we have been fearless and dared to be different. Our approach can only bring good fortune and positive vibes our way, right?   The artists selected in Fortune Favours the Brave have a bold and gutsy approach to their art practice, something we can't help but admire and celebrate, especially in times like these.  Featuring work by Alvaro Alvarez, Suzanne Barnes, Michael Camakaris, Jacob Cartelli, Valerio Ciccone, Alan Constable, Salome Felsinger, Gavin Porter, Adrian Lazzaro, Anne Lynch, Anthony Romagnano, Laura Sheehan, Amani Tia and Paul Quick.  Scroll through exhibition below or view PDF here. This exhibition coincides with James MacSporran's solo show From the Streets. 

STRENGTH IN NUMBERS

STRENGTH IN NUMBERS

Strength in Numbers delights in the moments and reflects on a time when we could do fun stuff (when was that again?...what day is it?). Outdoor pursuits with groups of friends, family or perfect strangers; swimming in a lake, going on a hike, riding a roller-coaster, going dancing or to the theatre, to a wedding or out for dinner. Just gathering. Although it seems the adventures and events shared in groups are a distant memory, belief in the common good is very much alive, and realised through collective participation and the formation of a shared will. We are defined as a culture by our stories, thoughts, feelings, images and moments. These things still exist and are being circulated in great abundance in the virtual realm. We may need to actively avoid the trash, but the impulse to share and keep connected is such that pleasure, meaning and joy can survive through this period. Digital platforms have enabled dancers to keep dancing with one another, artists to keep producing together and friends to keep gathering. And while we can’t ride rollercoasters just yet, we will soon. And until then there’s Netflix Party. Featuring work by Anthony Romagnano, Paul Hodges, Leo Cussen, Amani Tia, Bobby Kyriakopoulos, Steven Ajzenberg, Terry Williams, Lisa Reid, Michelle Coulson, Samraing Chea and Cathy Staughton. Scroll through exhibition below or view PDF here.   This exhibition coincides with Bronwyn Hack's solo show The Bonds that Bind Us Produced by Jo Salt, Gallery Administrator at Arts Project Australia.

THE BONDS THAT BIND US

THE BONDS THAT BIND US

Bronwyn Hack is known for her multi-faceted practice which spans sculpture, painting, printmaking and ceramics. Her latest suite of 2D works completed towards the end of 2019 continue to display the artist's characteristic composition; merging subject and background to form a consolidated linear perspective. The subject matter in this body of work is remarkably timely, exploring the intimate bonds that exist between Hack and her friends and colleagues at Arts Project Australia, and in turn the bonds they share with their pets. The images are particularly poignant in this moment, serving as a reminder of those who are missed as we move through a period of lockdown, the solace found in our furry companions and the notion that the strongest bonds have adversity in their framework. The tender portrayal of the subject matter unearths ideas around connection, trust, protection, love and companionship.  Bronwyn Hack has worked in the studio at Arts Project Australia since 2011. In 2016 she held a solo exhibition at Arts Project Australia entitled Be Careful Now and has exhibited in numerous group exhibitions including Auto Body Works curated by Patricia Sharkey, Arts Project Australia, Melbourne (2018); Wild Lands, Linden New Art Melbourne (2016); Nests, Northcity4, Melbourne (2015); My Puppet, My Secret Self, The Substation, Newport (2012); and Melbourne Art Fair, Melbourne (2012 & 2014). In 2018 Hack participated the Artist in Residence Program at Australian Tapestry Workshop. Scroll through exhibition below or view PDF here.     This exhibition coincides with the group show Strength in Numbers Produced by Jo Salt, Gallery Administrator at Arts Project Australia.      

SSBBW: SUPER SIZED BIG BEAUTIFUL WOMEN

SSBBW: SUPER SIZED BIG BEAUTIFUL WOMEN

Chris Mason is an accomplished artist working across the disciplines of painting, drawing, sculpture and ceramics. His practice involves extensive research, generating ideas that span across a wide range of subject matter with particular focus on voluptuous female forms and animals such as snakes and fish. Idiosyncratic and humorous, Mason’s works are often inspired by photographs and images collected by the artist. By extension and as part of his process, Mason also writes stories that relate directly to his thematic explorations. With a keen interest in animal rights, Mason has recently extended his practice to experimenting with the possibilities of cruelty-free taxidermy.  Chris Mason has worked in the Arts Project Australia studio since 1997. Solo exhibitions include Chris Mason Solo, Darren Knight Gallery, Sydney, 2014; Michelle, Arts Project Australia Gallery, Melbourne, 2007; and The Chris Mason Show, Arts Project Australia Gallery, Melbourne, 2002. Group exhibitions include Spring1883, The Hotel Windsor, Melbourne, 2018; Auto Body Works (curated by Patrice Sharkey), Arts Project Australia Gallery, Melbourne, 2018; The Public Body, Artspace, Woolloomooloo, Sydney, 2017; The Museum of Everything, Museum of Old and New Art (MONA), Tasmania, 2017; Summer on the blue seat, West Space, Melbourne, 2016; and Outsiderism Fleisher Ollman Gallery, Philapelphia, USA. Collections include the National Gallery of Australia (NGA), State Library of Victoria and National Gallery of Victoria (NGV). Scroll through exhibition below or view PDF here.   This exhibition coincides with the online group show 'Silver Linings'. Produced by Sim Luttin, Curator and Gallery Manager at Arts Project Australia.  

CIRCUIT BREAKER: EXTRAORDINARY MEASURES, EXTRAORDINARY TIMES

CIRCUIT BREAKER: EXTRAORDINARY MEASURES, EXTRAORDINARY TIMES

It's not often we get the chance to throw everything up in the air and reconsider the way we do things and how we engage with people. While it's been an uncertain, scary and sometimes tragic time, it's also been creatively exciting when you think about it. For Arts Project Australia, making the difficult decision to close the studio and gallery temporarily has forced us to rethink the way we advocate, support and promote our artists. Like everyone, we've had to shift to communicating and sharing our stories solely online.  Our current circumstances have led us to generate new initiatives that (even though it's early days) show great promise, such as developing an online 'virtual' studio space for our artists to connect, talk and share their artwork and ideas on life and art with our staff. In its infancy, the new program has great potential for future engagement, even after the artists return to the studio. Early in these exceptional times, we decided to move our 2020 exhibition schedule to 2021; to free up space at Arts Project Australia for the gradual return of artists with social distancing. In other words, we have created the space to rethink how we operate this year, and the gallery may very well become an extension of the studio for the short term.  Extraordinary times call for extraordinary measures, which has also prompted a rethink of our exhibitions in 2020...no gallery for people to visit, no worries! We'll use this time as a circuit breaker and deliver new shows, artist Q&As and innovative projects online. Who knows - we might come up with something new that we would never have thought of (or thought possible) had it not been for life throwing us one hell of a curveball. Our latest group exhibition features artworks that will make you stop, think twice and reflect. Scroll through exhibition below or view PDF here. This exhibition coincides with an online solo of work by Dorothy Berry titled LadyBird: Being Normal is Boring.

LADYBIRD: BEING NORMAL IS BORING

LADYBIRD: BEING NORMAL IS BORING

Dorothy Berry is an established artist whose practice spans four decades. While now in her twilight years, she has always approached her practice with great passion, which is evident in the energy and vibrancy of her paintings and drawings. Her work demonstrates a keen interest in animals, particularly birds, and often depicts them in a symbolic sense. Berry has developed an intricate set of signs in order to construct personal narratives and her work often recounts an experience, event, belief or opinion relating to her life. Her compositions frequently consist of an accumulation of these incidents or symbols, instilling the works with personal significance. Dorothy Berry (born 1942) has been a regular studio artist at Arts Project Australia since 1985, and presented four solo exhibitions at Arts Project Australia including; ‘Dorothy Berry – Bird on a Wire’ (2009); ‘A Survey 1987-2002’ (2002); and ‘Recent Works’ (1998). She has been included in numerous group exhibitions including ‘My Puppet, My Secret Self’, The Substation, Newport; ‘Inside Out/Outside In’, Access Gallery, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne; and ‘Turning the Page’, Gallery 101, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Her work is held in the National Gallery of Australia Collection, Canberra, and MADmusée, Lèige. Scroll through exhibition below or view PDF here.   This exhibition coincides with the online group show 'Circuit Breaker'. Produced by Sim Luttin, Curator and Gallery Manager at Arts Project Australia.    

IN THE MOMENT OF IN-BETWEEN

IN THE MOMENT OF IN-BETWEEN

  At a time when the physical world seems to have hit the pause button, the virtual world is rapidly adjusting to a new normal. A lot of content is being shared and streamed that is unsettling or merely filling space. Then there are the gems that cut through and catch your attention, motivating us to read on. Enter Max Delany, Artistic Director & CEO at ACCA, who shared a thought-provoking article online published on 3 April 2020 in The Sydney Morning Herald. Titled 'Were so many of us wrong? Christos Tsiokas on the new uncertainty', Tsiokas' musings reflect on this point in time: our current moment of in-between. On the one hand, global circumstances allow (amongst other things) time to cultivate patience and reflection, while our longing to have personal contact with people, animals and things is as palpable as ever.  For Arts Project Australia's latest virtual offering 'In the Moment of In-Between', we share a collection of artwork by numerous studio artists that present some scenarios we might otherwise take for granted. These things—particularly at this moment in time—are possibly some of the essential interactions and communal activities we should reflect on, hold tightly, and value the most. Featuring work by Dionne Canzano, Boris Cipusev, Alan Constable, Leo Cussen, Bronwyn Hack, Matthew Gove, Paul Hodges, Bobby Kyriakopoulos, Miles Howard-Wilks, Fiona Longhurst, Lisa Reid, Anthony Romagnano, Adrian Salvatore, Rebecca Scibilia, Amani Tia and Terry Williams. Scroll through exhibition below or view PDF here. This exhibition coincides with Steven Ajzenberg's solo show 'What a show-off, mine's bigger than yours'. Produced by Sim Luttin, Curator and Gallery Manager at Arts Project Australia.

COVID-19 UPDATE: ARTS PROJECT IS CURRENTLY CLOSED. WE CONTINUE TO OPERATE ONLINE AND SALES WILL BE PROCESSED ONCE A WEEK.